BPA-Free Plastics: Are They As Safe As They Claim To Be?

As healthy people and conscientious parents, we avoid BPA plastics like the plague. But are the BPA alternatives any safer?

As healthy people and conscientious parents, we avoid BPA plastics like the plague. After all, BPA was linked to:

  • Developmental issues in children
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Reproductive issues

In response to public awareness of these issues, most plastic manufacturers migrated to BPA-free alternatives.

But are the BPA alternatives any safer?

Not really. The two main alternatives, bisphenol-S (BPS) or bisphenol-F (BPF), appear to have similar – or even worse – endocrine-disrupting traits. Recently, the Center for Environmental Health (CEH), in Oakland, California tested 35 BPA-free children’s sippy cups and found that nine of them contained chemicals that mimic natural estrogen, which was the problem with BPA in the first place.

Here’s another scary thing. This danger isn’t just limited to plastics. Traces of these chemicals, including BPA, are found in paper, glass, and the aluminum used in canned foods.

So what should you do?

“Until we have some idea of what chemicals are added in all stages in making a final product, we will not be able to determine the safety of any plastic product,” says Frederick vom Saal, a University of Missouri biologist who studies endocrine disruptors.

In other words, stick to glass or stainless steel containers for now.

As healthy people and conscientious parents, we avoid BPA plastics like the plague. But are the BPA alternatives any safer?